New recipes

Eat'n Park: Small Portion Size

Eat'n Park: Small Portion Size



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

  1. Home

October 3, 2012

By

Small Portion Size

Went here last week with a friend & her daughter. Her daughter ordered mushroom swiss burger & sweet potato fries. Not worth the price she was charged.


What's new

With so many people making resolutions to eat healthy in 2009, I thought I’d share a popular recipe that’s both healthy and delicious. With only 259 calories per serving, our Stuffed Sole will be good to your taste buds AND your waistline.

Good luck and enjoy - but don’t forget to stop by Eat’n Park to enjoy our Eat’n Smart selections year-round.

Click here to view a printable version of the recipe.

Stuffed Sole
YIELD: 10 servings

INGREDIENTS:
10 servings sole 3-4 oz. each

Seafood Stuffing:

  • ½ lbs. Shrimp and scallops
  • 4 oz. Panko bread crumbs
  • 1 oz. Pepper, green, diced
  • 1 oz. Onion, diced
  • 1 oz. Celery, diced
  • ¾ cup Mayonnaise
  • 1 tsp. Worcestershire Sauce
  • ½ tsp. Garlic Salt
  • ¼ tsp. Black Pepper
  • 2 cups Fresh Spinach, washed, julienne

PROCEDURE:
1. Stuffing: Combine all ingredients and mix well.
2. Divide in to 2 oz. portions.
3. Place a 1½” to 2” slit in the center of the valley of the sole fillet.
4. Lay the sole out in front of you with the gray line facing up.
5. Place the stuffing in the center and fold in the two sides to cover the stuffing.
6. Bake at 375 degrees to an internal temperature of 165 degrees.
7. Top with hollandaise sauce.

Nutritional Information:

Note: Nutritional data varies depending on the portion size used. Data below is for a 3 oz. sole portion, without the hollandaise topping.

Calories (kcal) 259
Fat (g) 15
Carbs (g) 11
Protein (g) 20
Cholesterol (mg) 53
Dietary Fiber (g) 1
Sodium (mg) 472


In the late 1940s, Larry Hatch and Bill Peters were supervisors at Isaly's Restaurants in Pittsburgh. On a trip to Cincinnati, Hatch was impressed seeing the Frisch's Big Boy Drive In operation. He and Peters contacted Big Boy founder Bob Wian, reaching a 25-year agreement to operate Big Boy Restaurants in the Pittsburgh area, which would be called Eat'n Park. [10]

Eat'n Park launched on June 5, 1949, when Hatch and Peters opened a 13-stall drive-in restaurant on Saw Mill Run Boulevard in the South Hills neighborhood of Pittsburgh. Advertised as "Pittsburgh's First Modern Eat-in-your-Car Food Service" this location was serviced by 10 carhops. [11] Four months later, a second unit opened in Pittsburgh, by 1956: 11 units, 1960: 27 units, 1965: 30 units, and by 1973: 40 Eat'n Park locations. [12] After leaving Big Boy, the chain entered Ohio and West Virginia, and eventually grew to over 75 restaurants. [1] In 2017, there are 69 Eat'n Park restaurants operating. [4]

In 1974, Eat'n Park allowed their 25-year Big Boy franchise agreement to expire. This was publicly attributed to discontinuation of car hop service—which ended in 1971—but it was largely motivated by the end of $1 per year licensing fee Eat'n Park enjoyed. [13] As a result, the Big Boy hamburger was renamed the Superburger. The non-renewal of the Big Boy agreement eventually allowed Eat'n Park to expand into areas licensed to other Big Boy franchises. Eat'n Park expanded into Northeast Ohio including Greater Cleveland, Akron and Youngstown, and into West Virginia: first Morgantown, followed by Clarksburg and Wheeling. (In 1977, Big Boy reassigned the Pittsburgh territory to Wheeling-based Elby's Big Boy. [14] Sold to Elias Brothers Big Boy in 1986, the Elby's locations closed in 2000 when Elias Brothers faced bankruptcy, the rights now owned by Big Boy Restaurant Group. The closest Big Boy restaurants operate in Greater Cleveland and Frisch's Big Boy restaurants in Port Clinton, Fremont and Columbus.) In Morgantown and Clarksburg, Eat'n Park competes with fellow former Big Boy franchisee Shoney's.

The company launched its signature Smiley Cookie in 1986 to coincide with adding a bakery to its locations. The Smiley Cookie came from Warner's Bakery, a small bakery in Titusville, Pennsylvania. [15] The Smiley Cookie would become so popular that it would eventually be added to its logo and would spawn the "Frownie" brownie from rival Kings Family Restaurants, which would be controversially discontinued in 2015 after Kings was sold to a private equity firm. [16] Eat'n Park filed several lawsuits against companies outside the restaurants' operating area to enforce its trademark [17] on the Smiley Cookie. [18] [19] [20]

In 2011, Eat'n Park was awarded the Achievement of Excellence award from the American Culinary Federation. [21]

Since 2013, Eat'n Park has been a sponsor of the YouTube series Pittsburgh Dad.

Former locations Edit

While Eat'n Park currently serves western Pennsylvania, eastern Ohio and northern West Virginia, the chain also served the Harrisburg, Lancaster, and York, Pennsylvania markets from the mid-1990s to 2010. At one time having operated five restaurants in the Harrisburg market alone, by 2010 only one remained in Harrisburg, and one each in New Cumberland, Lancaster, and York. In March 2010, the New Cumberland and Lancaster locations were closed and sold, and by October 1, 2010 Eat'n Park closed their last two area restaurants—in York and Harrisburg—due to low sales. [22]

On October 4, 2015, Eat'n Park closed one restaurant in State College, Pennsylvania after operating for 24 years due to a decline in sales. [23]

On January 17, 2019, Eat'n Park announced it was closing six restaurants due to under-performing sales. Four were in Greater Cleveland, while the other two were in Boardman, Ohio and New Castle, Pennsylvania, both in close proximity to Youngstown, Ohio. Eat'n Park will continue to operate its three other Youngstown-area locations. Although this removed the Eat'n Park brand from the Cleveland area, the company continues to operate a Cleveland area Hello Bistro restaurant with plans to open a second unit. [24] [25]

On January 27, 2019, Eat'n Park closed one of the two restaurants in Erie, Pennsylvania. Having operated for 29 years, the building will be demolished and a Chick-fil-A restaurant constructed on the site. [26]

Eat'n Park has been expanding its offerings outside its namesake family restaurants, operating upscale restaurants as well as more casual eating places.

The company's most successful concept is Hello Bistro, a fast casual chain focused on millennials offering gourmet burgers and salads while keeping its parent company ties to a minimum by offering prepackaged Smiley Cookies and the same brand of ranch dressing as the main Eat'n Park chain, but otherwise making no references to Eat'n Park. With six locations, Eat'n Park plans to expand the Hello Bistro concept throughout the Pittsburgh metropolitan area and potentially into new markets. [27]

Eat'n Park banned smoking throughout the chain on May 30, 2007, sixteen months before a statewide smoking ban was enacted in Pennsylvania.

A Christmas tradition in the Pittsburgh region is the annual airing of an animated Eat'n Park commercial that shows a Christmas star (named Sparkle) struggling to reach the top of a Christmas tree until the tree bends over to help the star up. [28] Released in 1982, in support of a charity at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, the commercial became so popular that Eat'n Park has re-aired the ad every year since, starting in late November. Eat'n Park now sells merchandise during the holiday season based on the ad. It is believed to be the longest-running Christmas commercial in the United States, longer than national television ads by Folgers, Hershey's Kisses, and M&M's, as well as a regional commercial by the Pennsylvania Lottery. [29] [30] Sparkle, the Eat'n Park Star was trademarked by Eat'n Park in 1990 but was abandoned two years later. [31]


CMU School of Design, Eat'n Park Restaurants Launch Innovative Partnership To Fight Childhood Obesity

PITTSBURGH—With obesity rates on the rise, the Carnegie Mellon University School of Design's Fitwits™ project (www.fitwits.org) and Pittsburgh-based Eat'n Park Restaurants (www.eatnpark.com) are joining forces to help fight the epidemic.

Fitwits is a fun, hands-on program designed to inform kids and families about healthy eating and active living. The game encourages families to interact with each other, ask questions and discuss health in a fun and engaging way. For five weeks, starting on Aug. 1, 2011, Eat'n Park Restaurants will introduce the Fitwits program to guests by offering a series of five Fitwits collectible character cards to families. Each card contains nutritional information, recipes, trivia and memory triggers to teach children about appropriate portion sizes.

During those five weeks, or while supplies last, families at Eat'n Park can request a free Fitwits Memory Game and Recipe Cards. In addition, families can participate in Fitwits' first-ever text-messaging game called "Road Trip with Elvis," which allows families to advise Fitwits character Elvis Pretzley how to make healthy choices during his busy travel schedule.

"For the past four years, our team has worked to improve health communication and education for kids," said Kristin Hughes, associate professor of design at Carnegie Mellon who leads Fitwits. "Increased health literacy and an understanding of nutrition provide the basic foundation needed to learn new skills that will help individuals identify and change bad habits, making them proactive participants in their own families' health. By changing the way people think about nutrition, we can change our communities for the better."

The Fitwits partnership is the most recent element in Eat'n Park's LifeSmilesTM initiative, a five-year, $1 million commitment to children's health and wellness. This comprehensive, community-wide wellness program is framed around the four pillars of First Lady Michelle Obama's "Let's Move!" campaign.

"Eat'n Park is committed to giving families the resources and knowledge they need to make healthier choices. Because of that, we think it's very important to support and amplify successful health initiatives like Fitwits," said Brooks Broadhurst, Eat'n Park's senior vice president, Food and Beverage.  "An important element of LifeSmiles is empowering our guests with choices and Fitwits provides a great, easy-to-understand dialogue about healthy choices. We're proud of this partnership."

Fitwits is a collaborative project between CMU's School of Design and UPMC St. Margaret Family Health Centers. The Fitwits and Eat'n Park partnership to fight childhood obesity was made possible by a $125,000 grant from The Heinz Endowments. Additionally, Open Science Initiative developed the text message game, and Tropo donated all text-messaging services.
     
###

About FitwitsTM: FitwitsTM is designed to encourage hands-on learning, allowing families the opportunity to interact with each other, ask questions, share information, invent new ideas and play. Fitwits is a collaborative project with Carnegie Mellon University's School of Design and UPMC St. Margaret Family Health Centers. It is funded by The Heinz Endowments. Learn more at www.fitwits.org.

About Eat'n Park Hospitality Group: Eat'n Park Hospitality Group is a portfolio of foodservice concepts focused on personalized dining. The restaurant division includes Eat'n Park Restaurants and Six Penn Kitchen, a neighborhood American bistro. Its contract foodservice division includes: Parkhurst Dining Services, a provider of contract dining services to businesses, higher education institutions and cultural centers and CURA Hospitality, which enhances life around great food through contract dining and management services for regional hospitals and senior living facilities. Since 1949, Pittsburgh-based Eat'n Park Restaurants has been a family-owned restaurant chain, serving guests across Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia. At the heart of Eat'n Park are more than 8,000 team members committed to providing friendly, attentive service and supporting a growing number of community initiatives, including an annual fundraising campaign that has generated more than $7 million for children's hospitals. Eat'n Park also donates more than 200,000 Smiley Cookies — the brand's iconic symbol — every year to support community events and fundraisers. 

About Carnegie Mellon University: Carnegie Mellon (www.cmu.edu) is a private, internationally ranked research university with programs in areas ranging from science, technology and business, to public policy, the humanities and the arts. More than 11,000 students in the university's seven schools and colleges benefit from a small student-to-faculty ratio and an education characterized by its focus on creating and implementing solutions for real problems, interdisciplinary collaboration and innovation. A global university, Carnegie Mellon's main campus in the United States is in Pittsburgh. It has campuses in California's Silicon Valley and Qatar, and programs in Asia, Australia, Europe and Mexico. The university is in the midst of a $1 billion fundraising campaign, titled "Inspire Innovation: The Campaign for Carnegie Mellon University," which aims to build its endowment, support faculty, students and innovative research, and enhance the physical campus with equipment and facility improvements.

About Tropo: Tropo is Voxeo's premier cloud communications platform, enabling software developers to quickly build and deploy powerful voice and text messaging applications. Since 1999, Voxeo has continuously unlocked communications in all its forms — voice, SMS, instant messaging, Twitter and more — for more than 200,000 developers, 45,000 companies and half of the Fortune 100. Headquartered in Orlando with offices in San Francisco, Beijing, Cologne and London, the company has torn down barriers to entry using open standards, disruptive innovation and a passion for problem solving that's fueled by a company-wide obsession with customer success.  To learn more visit http://tropo.com

About Open Science Initiative: Open Science Initiative is looking at scientific innovation in a new way.  Open Science Initiative is a nonprofit with the goal of helping researchers to be as productive as possible and tackle the most challenging problems in science. This is done through new forms of research funding that reward scientists for innovation as well as through its Web application, enabling scientists to collaborate and freely share their knowledge with others in the community. Through these efforts, Open Science Initiative aims to accelerate the pace of medical and scientific advances in the research community. To learn more, visit http://www.opsci.org

Pictured above are some of the Fitwits collectible character cards that Eat'n Park Restaurants will offer to guests.


Tip: Snacking

Snacks are okay, as long as they are smart food choices. If you want an afternoon pick-me-up or after-dinner snack, have a piece of fruit, or spread peanut butter or low-fat cream cheese on whole wheat toast. Don’t forget to include snacks in your daily food count. For example, 1 tablespoon of peanut butter spread on a slice of whole wheat toast counts toward the protein foods group and the grains group. Some ideas for healthy snacking include:

  • Have an ounce of cheese with some whole grain crackers, a container of low-fat or fat-free yogurt, or a 1-ounce portion of unsalted nuts.
  • Put fruit instead of candy in the bowl on your coffee table.
  • Keep a container of washed, raw vegetables in the fridge along with hummus or other healthy dips.
  • To limit your portion sizes, don't eat from the bag. Count out a serving, and put the bag away.
  • When you are out and need a snack, don’t be tempted by a candy bar. Instead, take along homemade trail mix in a plastic bag when you go out. If you need to buy a snack while you are on the go, pick up an apple or banana—most convenience stores carry them.

JOB SUMMARY

Responsible for preparing all bakery products, following company approved procedures, maintaining high standards in food quality, and proper appearance as outlined in the department training guide. Team members are also required to perform other tasks as directed by a supervisor.

  1. Weighing, mixing, measuring, proofing, and baking all bakery products following company approved procedures and recipes in a timely manner.
  2. Inspecting and serving only those products that meet company standards for quality and appearance.
  3. Rotating and dating products to ensure freshness.
  4. Following company policy on maintaining proper temperatures of the oven and proofer.
  5. Follow company safety and sanitation policies and procedures including no bare hands contact.
  6. Maintain an open line of communication with management on products, supplies, and condition of equipment.
  7. Follow cleaning schedule as provided by management using “clean as you go” techniques.
  8. Follow company attendance policy including arriving for work timely, following calling off procedures, and maintaining an acceptable attendance record.
  9. Follow the uniform dress code and maintain proper personal hygiene.
  10. Follow all Eat’n Park guest satisfaction procedures including i-care and service imperatives.
  11. Work well with others and assist fellow team members as needed.

To perform this job successfully, an individual must be able to perform each essential function satisfactorily. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities

to perform the essential functions and physical demands of the job.

The physical demands described here are representative of those that must be met by a team member to successfully perform the essential functions of this job.

  • Standing and/or walking – 100% of time.
  • Occasionally lifting up to 50 lbs.
  • Frequently lifting up to 25 lbs.
  • Working in temperatures that may exceed 90 degrees.

Tagged with:

So you want to be a Buffet/Salad Bar person for Eat’n Park?

The first thing that you will need to do is read through the following job description. Make sure that working on a buffet or salad bar is something that you can and want to do. The next thing that you will need to do is visit an Eat’n Park restaurant and ask for an application. Try to visit the restaurant between the hours of 2 and 4 PM and pick a weekday. If you do this, the higher the probability that you will get an interview on the spot.


The setup of a typical Eat’n Park restaurant is that of a classic diner. Branches in general are spacious, and the background is generally relaxed.

Serving typical American fast food fare, the restaurant offers meals that are freshly prepared, tasty, and provide great value for money.

They have an expansive menu that covers everything from breakfast to dessert. Must-try items include the Superburger, their Endless Soup, Salad, and Fruit Bar, and their signature Smiley Cookie.

The service in Eat’n Park is also quite impressive. They are generally courteous, and their serving times are consistently quick.


Weight Watchers Points & Nutrition

Use the interactive features to view the Weight Watchers Points or restaurant nutrition in the table below. Click here for help on using the interactive features. We recommend using Google Chrome or Internet Explorer for the interactive table as some of the interactive features do not work with FireFox.

Note: Javascript must be enabled to use the interactive features. If you don't have javascript enabled, you will not be able to search, filter, sort or use the drop down menu.


Eat'n Park: Small Portion Size - Recipes

I used to go to Eat'n Park with my Dad. We almost always went for breakfast and always ordered the breakfast bar. There are so many things to choose from and all of it was delicious. We always left full and very satisfied. I have eaten there for lunch there also and it was good too.

153 - 157 of 214 reviews

We stopped here to eat for Breakfast on a bus trip. Ordered the Breakfast buffet and it was delicious! Had a nice variety of fruit, potatoes, eggs ,apple and corn fritters, bacon, sausage , biscuits , muffins and a variety of syrups for French toast and pancakes. Wish I would have got our servers name as she was very kind and smiled a lot! Very clean and had an elephant statue great for photo op in the parking lot. May stop back if I was this way to see flight 93 memorial someday as it is in this direction. This is near the turnpike!

This Eat'n Park, while one of a chain, retains its own unique small town flavor. In addition to a life-size elephant statue in its parking lot, the number of local residents who make up the majority of the diners tells one this is not a typical fast food box drive-through. Servers like Terri and Missy make everyone feel like family, and the menu and buffet offer an impressive list of interesting dishes at prices that will stretch travelers' budgets. Although travels can eat at the various options found in the turnpike rest-areas, they will be missing a much more relaxing stop just two blocks from the turnpike exit if they pass this Somerset Eat'n Park by.

Some if the best chili ever served in a restaurant. Breakfast smile is a good way to start the day and the lemon sole is a super choice whether you are watching your calories or just enjoy good fish.

This is a great restaurant. lots of choices on the menu,Portions were a good size,And price is reasonable, susan F. Is the best waitress tip her well she deserves it try to go here as time permits


Eat'n Park Restaurant

long lines and great breakfast is what you're gonna get from this place. if this two sounds good to you, then you should definitely try this place out!

long lines and great breakfast is what you're gonna get from this place. if this two sounds good to you, then you should definitely try this place out!

Eat'N Park Restaurant is only open for breakfast and lunch but their food is worth the wait. They can be crowded but that just shows how good it is. The building is kind of old but I think that adds to it charm. You'll love the many choices of omelets.

Eat'N Park Restaurant is only open for breakfast and lunch but their food is worth the wait. They can be crowded but that just shows how good it is. The building is kind of old but I think that adds to it charm. You'll love the many choices of omelets.

When I first saw this place I thought the building was waiting to be torn down. Don't let the building fool you. This place makes HUGE delicious omelets for a super cheap price. There are other things on the menu but I haven't worked my way through the omelet selection yet. They are only open for breakfast and lunch and are often crowded, but it is worth the wait.

When I first saw this place I thought the building was waiting to be torn down. Don't let the building fool you. This place makes HUGE delicious omelets for a super cheap price. There are other things on the menu but I haven't worked my way through the omelet selection yet. They are only open for breakfast and lunch and are often crowded, but it is worth the wait.

ugh! i had heard good things about the breakfasts here, which i'm convinced are from people who judge food based on portion-size only (i.e. gi-normous=fabulous). sigh. while, i've not tried the omeletes personally -- i have no desire to after the icky burger i ate there. it was so greasy, tasted liked fried mediocrity, no burger taste at all. total ick-fest. now, burbank is no bastion of culinary greatness, but there are many better burgers to be had here.

ugh! i had heard good things about the breakfasts here, which i'm convinced are from people who judge food based on portion-size only (i.e. gi-normous=fabulous). sigh. while, i've not tried the omeletes personally -- i have no desire to after the icky burger i ate there. it was so greasy, tasted liked fried mediocrity, no burger taste at all. total ick-fest. now, burbank is no bastion of culinary greatness, but there are many better burgers to be had here.

The reason these folks claim they have the best omelettes in Burbank is because they use 4 or more eggs in preparing them so they are huge. However in my opinion ingredients are what makes a really good omelette and they cut every corner here to try and keep prices low. A sea of egg can't hide the fact that their fillings are poor quality, old, and kind of gross (specifically bell peppers cut in TINY cubes you couldn't even taste). They will fill you up though! Lots of construction guys and police the day I was there.

The reason these folks claim they have the best omelettes in Burbank is because they use 4 or more eggs in preparing them so they are huge. However in my opinion ingredients are what makes a really good omelette and they cut every corner here to try and keep prices low. A sea of egg can't hide the fact that their fillings are poor quality, old, and kind of gross (specifically bell peppers cut in TINY cubes you couldn't even taste). They will fill you up though! Lots of construction guys and police the day I was there.

Pros: Quantity, Nice waitress

Cons: Quality very low, greasy spoon, cheap ingredients

Not only are their omlettes the best, but they ar huge and very inexpensive!! They are only open until 2pm and breakfast is served all the way till then. As if the omlettes weren't huge enough, they always offer omlettes made for two people (which is more like for 4!) Eat & Park is a must try!

Not only are their omlettes the best, but they ar huge and very inexpensive!! They are only open until 2pm and breakfast is served all the way till then. As if the omlettes weren't huge enough, they always offer omlettes made for two people (which is more like for 4!) Eat & Park is a must try!

Pros: Great omlettes, inexpensive, large portions

Cons: gets crowded Sun AM, small place

Wait, you're the expert.

If you've been to or used Eat'n Park Restaurant, leave a review.

It's easy, only takes a couple of minutes and you'll help thousands make an informed decision.


Watch the video: Eat N Park Mama (August 2022).