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Chicory au gratin recipe

Chicory au gratin recipe


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  • Side dish
  • Vegetable side dishes

A lovely way to use chicory when it's in season. Add more ham to make it a heartier dish.

15 people made this

IngredientsServes: 8

  • 8 chicory heads, trimmed
  • 30g butter
  • 2 tablespoons plain flour
  • 250ml milk
  • 130g grated Gruyere cheese, divided
  • 2 teaspoons grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg, or to taste
  • salt and ground black pepper to taste
  • 8 slices deli-style ham
  • 4 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

MethodPrep:25min ›Cook:30min ›Ready in:55min

  1. Lightly grease a baking dish.
  2. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to the boil over medium-high heat. Place the chicory into the water. Cover, and cook until tender, 5 to 10 minutes.
  3. Place the butter into a saucepan, and melt over medium heat. Whisk in the flour, and stir until the mixture becomes paste-like and golden brown. Gradually whisk the milk into the flour mixture, whisking constantly until thick and smooth. Stir in 3/4 of the grated Gruyere, Parmesan, nutmeg, salt and pepper until well blended. Cook gently over medium-low heat for 10 minutes, stirring frequently.
  4. Preheat an oven grill to low.
  5. Drain the chicory. Wrap each chicory head with a slice of ham, and place into the prepared baking dish. Pour the cheese sauce over the chicory. Sprinkle with the remaining Gruyere and parsley.
  6. Cook the chicory under preheated grill until cheese is golden brown and sauce bubbles, about 10 minutes.

Recently viewed

Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(18)

Reviews in English (14)

by Cathy Van de Moortele

Wonderful recipe. If you don't want your sauce to become too runny, cook your endives the day before, so they can drain well. I'm Belgian too and this is one of our favorite Belgian dishes. :-)-01 Apr 2009

by A Forest Of Stars

This recipe turned out exactly how my father always made it. I'm also Belgian, and it had been years since I've had this! It's AMAZING. Definitely one of my favorite meals ever. The sauce tastes amazing and complements perfectly with the flavor and texture of the endives. Will make over and over again! Thank you for posting this recipe. I will have my American friends try it-04 Aug 2009


Endives au Jambon/Ham and Chicory Gratin recipe

Today is a rainy day and I needed some comfort food for lunch. I posted this picture on my Facebook page and a few people asked for the recipe. My mum used to make 'Endives au Jambon' when I was a child. I like it, it's quick, simple and tasty. You need the same ingredients as for a croque-monsieur except that you replace the bread with chicory heads, we can call it an healthier version of croque-monsieur!

I didn't get my mum's recipe this time and used one from Le Figaro Madame and translated it into English.

Endives au Jambon/ Ham and Chicory Gratin

-4 chicory heads
-4 slices of ham
-1 Tbs of creme fraiche
-50g of flour
-125 g of grated cheese (gruyere, I used Irish cheddar)
-75cl of milk
-Salt, Pepper and grated nutmeg to taste

Trim the chicory heads and wash them.

Bring a saucepan of salted water to the boil at medium heat and cook the chicory heads for about 15 minutes or until soft, in the boiling water. Drain the chicory heads and leave them to stand on some paper towels.

In a sauce pan, melt the butter and add the flour mixing with a spatula until you get a slightly brown mixture. Don't let it burn!

Take the pan off the heat and slowly add the milk while whisking briskly. Put the saucepan back on the heat until you get a creamy mixture. Add the creme fraiche, some salt, pepper and grated nutmeg to taste. Remove from the heat when the mixture looks like a creamy béchamel.

Wrap each chicory head in a slice of ham and place in a gratin dish.

Cover with the bechamel sauce and sprinkle the grated cheese on top.

Cook in the oven for about 20 minutes or until the cheese looks nicely golden.


Belgian Chicory Ham Rolls (Witloofrolletjes)

This is my way of prepare chicory rolls.

If you want it extra cheesy, then you can also wrap a slice of cheese around the endives. Or add cheese to the béchamel sauce which makes it a mornay sauce. Because you can easily make these chicory rolls in advance, this is also a great quick dinner option!

My dad is a pescatarian which means so much as he will eat fish but no meat.

So last time I prepared this dish, I replaced the ham by slices of smoked salmon.


TARTE AU CHEVRE

flour 200g

butter 100g

egg yolk 1

milk a little

onions 400g

butter 25g

thyme 2 tsp of leaves

creme fraiche 200g

full cream milk 200g

goat's cheese, moist and crumbly 180g

Tarte au chevre. Photograph: Jonathan Lovekin

You will also need a round 22cm tart tin at least 3.5cm deep with a removable base and beans for baking blind

Put the flour and butter, cut into small pieces, into the bowl of a food processor. Add a pinch of salt and blitz to fine breadcrumbs. If you prefer, rub the butter into the flour with your fingertips. Add the egg yolk and enough milk to bring the dough to a firm ball. The less milk you add, the better, as too much will cause your pastry case to shrink in the oven.

Pat the pastry into a flat round on a floured surface then roll out large enough to line the tart tin. Lightly butter the tin, dust it with a small amount of flour and shake off any surplus then lower in the round of pastry. Push the dough right into the corner where the rim joins the base without stretching the pastry. Make certain there are no holes or tears. Trim the overhanging pastry and place in the fridge to chill for 20 minutes.

Set the oven at 200C/gas mark 6. Put a baking sheet in the oven to warm. Line the pastry case with foil and baking beans and slide on to the hot baking sheet. Bake for 20 minutes, then remove from the oven and carefully lift the beans out. Return the case to the oven for 5 minutes or so, until the surface is dry to the touch. Remove from the oven and set aside. Turn the oven down to 180C/gas mark 4.

Make the filling. Peel the onions and slice them thinly. Melt the butter in a shallow pan and add the onions, leaving them to cook over a low heat for a good 20 minutes. As they show signs of softening, add the thyme. An occasionally stir with a wooden spoon will stop them sticking or burning. The onions are ready when they are sweet, gold and soft enough to crush between your fingers and thumb.

Crack the eggs into a bowl and beat to mix with a small whisk or fork. Beat in the creme fraiche and milk. Season with salt and black pepper. Spoon the onions into the pastry case. Crumble in the goat's cheese. Pour most of the egg mixture over the onions then transfer to the hot baking sheet in the oven. Pour in the remaining custard mixture and carefully slide into the oven. Bake for 40 minutes till lightly risen. The centre should quiver when the tart is gently shaken. Eat in the traditional style of a quiche, not hot nor cold, but warm.


Nutrition varies by type, but most cool-season greens supply fiber along with vitamins and minerals (including vitamin K, B-complex vitamins, manganese, copper, and iron) that are associated with strong bones healthy metabolism and brain, heart, and gut health. Endives, both curly and Belgian, also are good sources of folate.

Blue Cheese, Walnut, and Chicory Salad

"If you&aposve been looking at endive and radicchio in the stores for years but never bought any because you thought you just wouldn&apost like it, I&aposm here to tell you, you probably do — especially in a salad like this. When chicory is combined with a sweet and tangy mustard vinaigrette, mixed with toasted, crunchy nuts, and wonderfully rich, subtly salty blue cheese, it all makes perfect sense." 𠅌hef John

Midwinter Greens Tonic

Prefer to drink your greens? Try them in this easy blender tonic with apple, honey, ginger, and lemon--no juicer required! For more fiber, skip the straining. Garnish with celery and lemon curls.


Tag: Chicory

‘Witlof’, ‘Chicory’, ‘Chicon’, ‘Endive’, ‘Belgian Endive’… I’m never quite sure what to call this vegetable. Each country seems to have a different name for it. In Australia for example, we call it ‘witlof’? Here in France it is called ‘endive’ and would you believe it has been grown commercially since only the 1930’s.

Whatever the name for it, since moving to France I have developed a huge liking for this interesting vegetable from the Chicory family. Thanks to Benji and his mum, I was introduced to a beautiful new ingredient and a few recipes that are now family favourites. Even our six-year-old loves eating them.

Endives are so verstile – they make a great salad when served raw with vinaigrette drizzled over it or, the particular family favourite, when braised with white wine and lardons and parsley, over a gentle heat for a few hours (the longer the better, you want them to caramelise!). You can serve this dish on its own or it makes a great side dish to lamb chops, veal or pork.

During the first few weeks of us living back in Australia in 2004, I decided to prepare the family favourite for our friends who we were lodging with. I was so excited to share this newly-loved vegetable of mine. After quite a search, I finally found them in a fruit and veg shop in North Fitzroy. I filled the bag, enough for four people and when I went to pay I nearly fell over. They were so expensive! I concealed my shock and quietly paid the money, vowing never again to buy this vegie in this suburb again. I at last appreciated why Claude (my Frenchie – amazing cook – friend who was living in Western Australia with his NZ wife), when he had yearnings for a good old endive dish, would only use three or four of them in a gratin. Braising them en masse was a complete luxury. Anyway – big sigh of relief – the dish worked out pretty well that evening, but not to be repeated for quite some time!

Here in France however, they are cheap and we eat them regularly, especially around October. A few years ago, I had to prepare a lunch at the last minute for some friends of friends travelling through the area. I added pan-fried chicken thigh fillets and julienned carrots to a pot of left-over braised endives and the result was really delicious. One of our lunch guests, the owner of a well-known bakery in Melbourne (yeah, not much pressure), was keen to get the recipe. High five! I was tres contente. I’ve been adding the chicken and the carrots for many a meal since.

But much to my husband’s relief (I’m someone that could eat the same dish 4 times in the one week if I like it), I’ve branched out and tried a new recipe – the traditional ‘Gratin d’Endives au Jambon’ (Endives and Ham Gratin). Once again, as is usual for all the recipes I prepare, this is pretty simple and easy to make. It is a particularly good dish for the Autumn-Winter months and with today’s maximum temperature reaching six degrees celsius, I think I should get to it and make some.

Here’s the recipe for you… (I should tell Claude I’ve finally made it)

Gratin d’Endives au Jambon (serves 6)

ingredients:

(note: my quantities are always on the generous side – I prefer to have left-overs than not enough!)

8-10 endives (depending on size)

200g Swiss Gruyere, grated (the AOC Gruyere ‘Alpage’ or ‘Reserve’ are incredible! – and even available in Australia)

Trim stems off endives, pull off any discoloured leaves, then cut in half (I do this to help with cooking them through and browning)

Fry the endives in a pan over a low-medium heat with a little olive oil. As they begin to brown (or burn!), you can pour in a small amount of white wine to keep the pan moist. Fry until golden/dark golden and moisture has evaporated

(NB: some like to steam or boil the endives to part cook them but I prefer to fry them as I find there is too much liquid in the baking dish later when serving)

+ Heat oven to 180 degrees Celsius (about 7 or 8 on my gas oven) +

Fry the endives until golden

While the endives are cooking, prepare the cheese sauce (I like to grate the cheese before beginning the sauce so that your hands are free to keep stirring – and ready to be added when needed)

While the endives are cooking, prepare the cheese sauce

Melt butter in large saucepan

Heat milk in a different saucepan (it helps reduce overall cooking time if the milk is warm)

Stir in flour with a wooden spoon and cook for a few minutes over a gentle heat, stirring continuously.

Once it becomes a golden paste, pour in heated milk gradually, stirring continuously

(NB: How much milk you add depends on how thick or thin you like your sauce – my husband likes it thin and runny but I like it thickish and runny – so you may want to use less or more than the 1 litre. Just remember it will thicken over the heat eventually!)

Once it comes to the boil, add the cheese and stir until melted.

Oil a large gratin/ baking dish

Gather your endive halves, wrapping two halves inside each slice of ham (as though it’s a whole endive)

Place them in the baking dish and pour cheese sauce over the top – add a little extra grated Gruyere if desired

Place the wrapped endives in an oiled gratin/baking dish.
(there’s 10 and not 8 in this one) Pour the cheese sauce over the endives and sprinkle with grated Gruyere

Bake for about 30 minutes or until golden


Gratin d’Endives au Jambon

‘Witlof’, ‘Chicory’, ‘Chicon’, ‘Endive’, ‘Belgian Endive’… I’m never quite sure what to call this vegetable. Each country seems to have a different name for it. In Australia for example, we call it ‘witlof’? Here in France it is called ‘endive’ and would you believe it has been grown commercially since only the 1930’s.

Whatever the name for it, since moving to France I have developed a huge liking for this interesting vegetable from the Chicory family. Thanks to Benji and his mum, I was introduced to a beautiful new ingredient and a few recipes that are now family favourites. Even our six-year-old loves eating them.

Endives are so verstile – they make a great salad when served raw with vinaigrette drizzled over it or, the particular family favourite, when braised with white wine and lardons and parsley, over a gentle heat for a few hours (the longer the better, you want them to caramelise!). You can serve this dish on its own or it makes a great side dish to lamb chops, veal or pork.

During the first few weeks of us living back in Australia in 2004, I decided to prepare the family favourite for our friends who we were lodging with. I was so excited to share this newly-loved vegetable of mine. After quite a search, I finally found them in a fruit and veg shop in North Fitzroy. I filled the bag, enough for four people and when I went to pay I nearly fell over. They were so expensive! I concealed my shock and quietly paid the money, vowing never again to buy this vegie in this suburb again. I at last appreciated why Claude (my Frenchie – amazing cook – friend who was living in Western Australia with his NZ wife), when he had yearnings for a good old endive dish, would only use three or four of them in a gratin. Braising them en masse was a complete luxury. Anyway – big sigh of relief – the dish worked out pretty well that evening, but not to be repeated for quite some time!

Here in France however, they are cheap and we eat them regularly, especially around October. A few years ago, I had to prepare a lunch at the last minute for some friends of friends travelling through the area. I added pan-fried chicken thigh fillets and julienned carrots to a pot of left-over braised endives and the result was really delicious. One of our lunch guests, the owner of a well-known bakery in Melbourne (yeah, not much pressure), was keen to get the recipe. High five! I was tres contente. I’ve been adding the chicken and the carrots for many a meal since.

But much to my husband’s relief (I’m someone that could eat the same dish 4 times in the one week if I like it), I’ve branched out and tried a new recipe – the traditional ‘Gratin d’Endives au Jambon’ (Endives and Ham Gratin). Once again, as is usual for all the recipes I prepare, this is pretty simple and easy to make. It is a particularly good dish for the Autumn-Winter months and with today’s maximum temperature reaching six degrees celsius, I think I should get to it and make some.

Here’s the recipe for you… (I should tell Claude I’ve finally made it)

Gratin d’Endives au Jambon (serves 6)

ingredients:

(note: my quantities are always on the generous side – I prefer to have left-overs than not enough!)

8-10 endives (depending on size)

200g Swiss Gruyere, grated (the AOC Gruyere ‘Alpage’ or ‘Reserve’ are incredible! – and even available in Australia)

Trim stems off endives, pull off any discoloured leaves, then cut in half (I do this to help with cooking them through and browning)

Fry the endives in a pan over a low-medium heat with a little olive oil. As they begin to brown (or burn!), you can pour in a small amount of white wine to keep the pan moist. Fry until golden/dark golden and moisture has evaporated

(NB: some like to steam or boil the endives to part cook them but I prefer to fry them as I find there is too much liquid in the baking dish later when serving)

+ Heat oven to 180 degrees Celsius (about 7 or 8 on my gas oven) +

Fry the endives until golden

While the endives are cooking, prepare the cheese sauce (I like to grate the cheese before beginning the sauce so that your hands are free to keep stirring – and ready to be added when needed)

While the endives are cooking, prepare the cheese sauce

Melt butter in large saucepan

Heat milk in a different saucepan (it helps reduce overall cooking time if the milk is warm)

Stir in flour with a wooden spoon and cook for a few minutes over a gentle heat, stirring continuously.

Once it becomes a golden paste, pour in heated milk gradually, stirring continuously

(NB: How much milk you add depends on how thick or thin you like your sauce – my husband likes it thin and runny but I like it thickish and runny – so you may want to use less or more than the 1 litre. Just remember it will thicken over the heat eventually!)

Once it comes to the boil, add the cheese and stir until melted.

Oil a large gratin/ baking dish

Gather your endive halves, wrapping two halves inside each slice of ham (as though it’s a whole endive)

Place them in the baking dish and pour cheese sauce over the top – add a little extra grated Gruyere if desired

Place the wrapped endives in an oiled gratin/baking dish.
(there’s 10 and not 8 in this one) Pour the cheese sauce over the endives and sprinkle with grated Gruyere

Bake for about 30 minutes or until golden


Chicons au gratin (Chicory gratin)

Chicons au Gratin is perhaps the the most classic of Belgian recipes for home cooks and is usually consumed in winter. Recipes vary from one home to another, mainly in the making of the sauce, which is sometimes based on milk, sometimes based on the chicory cooking juices. In Flemish Belgium, this is known as Gegratineerd Witloof.

Ingredients

For the chicory:

For the Béchamel sauce:

  • 25g butter
  • 30g flour
  • 500ml warm milk
  • Seasoning
  • Nutmeg to taste
  • A pinch of paprika
  • 1 tablespoon single cream
  • Gratedcheese, to taste - choose a hard cheese such as Cheddar or Comté

Method

  1. Melt the butter in a large frying pan
  2. Sauté the garlic then add the chicory
  3. Stew for about 20 minutes
  4. Remove the chicory from the pan
  5. Wrap the ham around the chicory and place in a gratin dish
  6. Whilst the chicory is cooking, make the sauce
  7. Melt the butter in a saucepan
  8. Add the flour, mix vigorously and leave to cook for about 4 minutes.
  9. Add the milk a little at a time and stir until it boils so that it does not form lumps
  10. Add the cream, nutmeg, paprika, then season with salt and pepper.
  11. Pour the sauce over the chicory, and top with gratedcheese, breadcrumbs and a knob of butter.
  12. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes at 220° C (425° F - gas 7), [fan oven 200° C]

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#chicory #butter #sauce #ham #grated #paprika #nutmeg #flour #cheese #garlic #breadcrumbs


Recipe CXXI - Chicory au Gratin

Satan's own vegetable

Instructions: Firstly, and most importantly, cut out the base of the chicory to remove the hull. If you leave this bit in, your chicory will taste very, very bitter.

Put the chicory in lightly salted boiling water for between 10 and 15 minutes, until they are soft.
Put on the grill.
While this is going on, you can make the sauce. Make a roux by melting some butter in a pan, adding flour and milk as if making Béchamel.
Add nutmeg and pepper, then fold in most of the cheese until fully melted into the sauce.

Once the chicory is soft, remove it and roll it in the ham slice.

Repeat until all of the pieces are wrapped in ham. Put the ham-wrapped chicory in a decently-sized deep baking tray.

Pour the sauce over the top until totally covering the chicory.

Use some more of the cheese to grate over the top and sprinkle with black pepper.

Put it under the grill for a good 10 to 15 minutes, or until the top is a nice speckled dark pattern.

Serve with mashed potatoes or equivalent.

Invite a Belgian or two round to eat, and you won't have to throw a lot of it away!


How to Make It

Rinse Belgian endive trim off any discolored bases. Cut heads in half lengthwise. Arrange the halves, cut side down, in a single layer in a heavy 11- to 12-inch frying pan. Add 1/4 cup water and the olive oil. Sprinkle endive lightly with salt and pepper. Cover pan and bring to boil over high heat, then reduce heat and simmer until endive is very tender when pierced, 12 to 20 minutes. Uncover and cook over medium heat, turning heads occasionally, until liquid is evaporated and endive is slightly browned, 6 to 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a 1- to 2-quart pan over medium-low heat, melt butter. Stir in flour until blended and bubbly. Add milk and nutmeg stir until mixture is boiling and thickened, about 10 minutes. Stir in 1/2 cup cheese. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Arrange endive in a single layer in a shallow 2-quart baking dish. Spoon sauce over the top. Sprinkle evenly with remaining 1/4 cup cheese.

Bake, uncovered, in a 400° oven until sauce is bubbling and lightly browned, 9 to 14 minutes. Add more salt and pepper to taste.



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